Life After a Failed Suicide Attempt

 

Angry because of a failed suicide attempt? There’s hope..

 

If you’ve survived a failed suicide attempt, you may be dealing with many emotions including anger; anger that you were left to continue to face your troubles.  But could it be that God is giving you a second chance; a chance to find hope?

That’s what Kristen Jane Anderson discovered after her failed suicide attempt.  You can listen to her tell about how she discovered hope and purpose, even after losing her legs the night she survived laying down on the railroad tracks in front of an oncoming train, and 33 freight train cars at 55 miles per hour ran over her.

A train took her legs–yet God gave her a new life. See Kristen Anderson’s interview on CBN about her failed suicide attempt:

 

You can visit Kristen’s website at Reaching You Ministries (www.reachingyouministries.com) See also Kristen’s book (with Tricia Goyer): Life, In Spite of Me: Extraordinary Hope After a Fatal Choice. The Random House Digital version can be read on Kindle or on a computer, via Kindle for PC.

Kristen became desperate due to grief over losing four friends–one to suicide–then her grandma, then trauma from rape by a friend. See our articles (try our site SEARCH) on dealing with grief, including the loss of teen friends, and on sexual assault/rape, for more help. However:

 If you are contemplating suicide at this moment, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

If you would like to know more about God, and how to start a relationship with him, go to www.Godtest.com.

If you’ve ever wondered if you would go to hell if you committed suicide, check out our article on the topic by clicking HERE. But also we hope you wonder, “What can God do with my life, if I choose to live?” Kristen is now not only glad to be alive–she is hoping to save others, with God at her side.

Suicide Intervention: One Teen Helps Another

By S. Osborn:

One teen, who formerly contemplated suicide himself, saves the life of a suicidal friend with a suicide intervention.

 

In a former post, My Son Was Suicidal, I shared how my teen son at one point came close to taking his own life. Thankfully he decided to live, much to the relief of all who love him. Here’s what happened when a friend of his also had suicidal thoughts:

One night my telephone rang, and my son said, “Mom, I’m so glad you’re home. I need to talk to you. Brittney tried to commit suicide last night, but I stopped her.”

A few months earlier, my son had helped his friend, Brittney, through a difficult time in her life. Her parents had divorced, and since he had gone through that, he could empathize. He encouraged her to see a psychologist for her depression and drug problem. He thought she was doing much better—until the previous night.

I clutched the phone. “Tell me what happened.”

My son answered,“Brittney left a message on my answer machine. I had checked my messages earlier, but an inner voice told me to check them again.”

“You know Who that was, don’t you?” I asked, never missing an opportunity to witness to my jet-setting son who rarely took time to go to church.

“Oh, Mom, I know you pray for me all the time. I remember when you prayed for me six years ago when I was so depressed that I wrote a suicide note, took a knife, and ran out the door. You’ve told me you pray that angels will surround me and protect me.”

He added softly, “I know they did on that terrible night, and I guess they really did last night. If Brittney had died, I would have felt so guilty and would have wondered if I could have done more for her. All my life I would have carried that burden.”

“No way would it have been your fault if she had died, but thankfully, you were able to perform a suicide intervention. Now tell me what happened.”

He continued, “I checked my messages a second time, and there was a new one—from Brittney. Her voice sounded groggy, distant. I knew something was terribly wrong. I knew—I had been there…. I told my roommate, and we rushed to her house. Later we found out she had taken an overdose of pain killers, downed a bottle of wine, and taken some other drugs.”

I interrupted my son, “Is she going to be all right?”

“The doctor said she would have died if we had not found her when we did. I’m so thankful I checked my answer machine a second time. I rarely do that.”

We talked for about an hour—about his ability to perform a suicide intervention and what part God played in it. At the end of the conversation, my son said, “Mom, I’m glad I caught you before you left this morning. It helps to know you’re there.”

“I’ll always be here for you—no matter what.”

 You can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), a free, 24-hour hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. Your call will be routed to the nearest crisis center to you.

You can also dial the following National Suicide Prevention Hotline numbers operated by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the Department of Health and Human Services:

1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)

1-888-SUICIDE (1-888-784-2433)

1-877-SUICIDA (1-877-784-2432) (Spanish).

This story was taken from Too Soon to Say Goodbye: Healing and Hope for Suicide Victims and Survivors and used with permission by New Hope Publishers.

 

When a Teen Threatens Suicide

By Karen O’Connor:

 

“Suicide is the third highest cause of death among teens,” reported marriage and family counselor, Erin Torr from Santa Cruz, California, following a seminar she attended to help counselors, parents, students, and teachers take steps when a teen threatens suicide.

Mark Gregston, author, speaker, radio host, and the founder and executive director of Heartlight, a residential counseling program for struggling adolescents, in an article on Crosswalk.com, confirm those statistics. (See the article: What Parents Should Know About Teen Suicide.) 

Fact is, before the 1960’s, suicide by adolescents happened only rarely; but today, nearly one in ten teens contemplates suicide, and over 500,000 attempt it each year. While suicide rates for all other ages have dropped, suicides among teens have nearly tripled.”

Statistics can be alarming, but when a teen threatens suicide the numbers don’t matter. All you can think of is getting to that young man or woman before it’s too late. Torr offered some guidance:

“Talking directly and specifically is key,” she said. “The tendency is to assume you’ll encourage suicide if you name it or ask for details about a plan, weapons, pills, and so on. But the opposite is true.

It’s essential to get young people to talk about their feelings of hopelessness and despair. Externalizing their thinking takes some of the power out of their desire to end their lives, and can actually help them become open to new options for feeling better or different.”

Gregston agrees:

“Please don’t be slow in getting professional help.  I’ve seen many hundreds of teenagers who have become different people from medication designed to correct a deficiency in their developing brain. Others are helped by regular counseling to deal with their inner issues, or with treatment for their drug habit or other addictions in their life.  Get the help your teen needs, before they become a statistic.”

Check out this excellent YouTube: The Truth About Teenage Suicide (Reaching out).