Stop Fear in Its Tracks

By Pat Ennis:

Don’t underestimate how claiming scripture can stop fear in its tracks.

 

I pray that my previous post Stopping Fear Syndrome helped remind you that God’s Word is sufficient to override your fears. Are you ready for a follow-up antidote and scriptures to help you stop fear in its tracks?

My past post described the impotence of an old kind lion. Yet scripture teaches this about your enemy:

The devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour. Resist him, standing firm in the faith, because you know that the family of believers throughout the world is undergoing the same kind of sufferings.  (1 Peter 5:8-9)

To resist him, choose to live according to the truth of God’s Word (2 Corinthians 10:3-5; Ephesians 6:17).

As you obey God’s Word, fear is dispelled, because Jesus defeated Satan on the cross thus stripping him of his power and leaving him with a frightening, but harmless, roar (John 12:23-33; Colossians 2:11-15; Hebrews 2:14-15).

If you are going to refuse to succumb to Satan’s impotent roar you must replace fear with God’s Word (Psalm 119:11; Ephesians 6:10-20).  Begin today by memorizing and meditating upon these truths:

 

  • God is with you and will keep you wherever you go (Genesis 28:15).
  • You should not fear or be dismayed for the Lord goes before you; He will not leave you or forsake you (Deuteronomy 31:6, 8).
  • When God calls you into a difficult situation, you are to recall that the battle is not yours, but His (2 Chronicles 20:15).
  • When you are protected by your Savior’s rod and staff you do not need to fear any potentially threatening environment—even death (Psalm 23:4).
  • Because the Lord is your light, salvation, and the strength of your life you have no need to fear (Psalm 27:1).
  • When you are afraid you are to trust in God—an act of the will, not the emotions  (Psalm 56:3-4).

Also:

  • No person can subvert God’s protection of you (Psalm 56:11).
  • God has provided an intimate place of divine protection for you (Psalm 91:1-7).
  • The peace that your heavenly Father gives provides comfort in the midst of turmoil (John 14:27).
  • Spiritual resources, seeking the welfare of others rather than your own, and a properly prioritized mind, not a spirit of fear, is a gift from your heavenly Father (2 Timothy 1:7).

Because I spent too many years of the precious life my heavenly Father gave me wallowing in fear, I can speak with confidence that it is only God’s Word that can replace fear with a hope for the future (Jeremiah 29:11-13).  It was a miraculous day when I chose to allow trust in my heavenly Father to be my reflex response when faced with fear (Psalm 56:3, 11).  That was the day that I learned how to stop fear in its tracks!  It is my fervent prayer that you will do likewise (Philippians 1:6)!

 

Stopping Fear Syndrome

By Pat Ennis:

Fear is defined as “a distressing emotion aroused by impending danger, evil, pain, etc., whether the threat is real or imagined.”( Random House Webster’s College Dictionary, 2nd ed.)

We live in a fear dominated world—serious illness, weight gain, financial reversal, old age, death, rejection, and fear of man are all categories of fear that cause a focus away from God and toward circumstances.

Fear is real and it is not always negative—when you sense danger, fear usually stimulates you to fight or flee.  However, often the consequences are not positive—for example, fear can . . .

  • Hinder your relationship with others.
  • Stifle your ability to think rationally.
  • Rob you of joy.
  • Injure your relationship with God.
  • Create inner turmoil that can eventually lead to thoughts of suicide.

Since the presence of fear produces such detrimental results, it seems reasonable to locate an antidote to it. Scripture teaches that God’s Word is sufficient to override your fears.

  • The natural reaction to fear is panic. The antidote is to replace potential fear with trust in God (Psalm 56:3-4, 11).
  • Since God comforts you, why should you be afraid (Isaiah 51: 12-16)?
  • You can be content in every circumstance because God has promised to never leave or forsake you (Hebrews 13:5-6).

As you meditate upon the reality that Scripture constantly urges God’s children to trust rather than fear, consider this account that was shared by an African missionary about a herd of lions:

This particular story is about the old king.  You see a lion can only be the king as long as he is strong enough to hold his position— and there is always another lion trying to usurp it.  Usually by the time the old king is replaced he does not have any teeth and only a few claws.  His hair is matted, he has arthritis in the joints, and he no longer can fight to keep his position so a younger lion becomes the new king.

However, the old king is not entirely useless—he still has a role in the herd when the lions go on a hunt.  When the herd hunts, the old, mean-looking, ferocious lion stands on one side while the young hunter lions hide in the bushes on the opposite side.  When the prey appears, the former king looks at it and begins to roar; the roar scares the prey so badly that it runs to the opposite side—right into the waiting jaws of the hunter lions that attack and destroy it.  If the prey had run toward the roar, more than likely it would have been safe, since all the old lion had left was his roar.

The only positive fear recorded in scripture is the fear of God.  This fear is a reverence of God’s majesty, power, and greatness.  When you choose to “run to the roar” you will most likely find the influence of the fear dissolving.

How to Stop Discouragement

By Pat Ennis

Discouragement, extracted from the Greek word athumeo, means to be disheartened, dispirited, and discouraged.  It frequently occurs when expectations are unfulfillment by hoping for impractical outcomes or anticipating unrealistic relationships. The greater the gap between hope and fulfillment, the greater the potential for discouragement and anger. An analysis of the prophet Elijah’s life (1 Kings 19:1-22; 2 Kings 2:1-10) provides us with biblical guidelines that shows us how to stop discouragement.     

Elijah faced off with 450 false prophets of Baal and though he emerged a victor (1 Kings 18:18-46), Queen Jezebel did not share his enthusiasm.  In fact, she was furious (1 Kings 19:1-2)! Instead of surrendering, as Elijah had expected, she issued an ultimatum, “So let the gods do to me, and more also, if I do not make your life as the life of one of them by tomorrow about this time” (1 Kings 19:3).

Elijah’s response is what I call the Elijah Effect:

  • Fear! (1 Kings 19:1-2).
  • Running away from his problems (1 Kings 19:3).
  • Thinking negative thoughts instead of meditating on God’s faithfulness (1 Kings 19:4).
  • Emotional and physical fatigue (1 Kings 19:5-9).
  • False expectations and unrealistic attitudes regarding the responsibilities God called him to assume (1 Kings 19:10).
  • And then the big one – self-pity (1 Kings 19:14).

If you find yourself caught in the downward spiral of Elijah Effect , try:

  • Resting and relaxing (1 Kings 19:5-9).
  • Focusing on communion with (talking to) God (1 Kings 19:9-13).
  • Using the Word of God as a sword to fight the source of discouragement, Satan (Ephesians 6:17).
  • After a season of rest, resume your activity so that you are  not ‘soaking and souring’ (1 Kings 19:15-18).
  • Allowing friends to minister to you (Proverbs 17:17).

As you consider Elijah’s life, you will see how to stop discouragement when faced with difficult circumstances so you can follow God into a brighter tomorrow.

If you need some encouragement, watch this video of Donnie McClurkin singing Days of Elijah: