Bullied No More! a Poem by Martha Bolton

By Martha Bolton:

How can you experience victory over bullying? Part of the solution is how you choose to react and seek support.

 

Recently a young jewelry designer took her own life,  leaving behind notes describing how she’d been bullied by some co-workers and classmates in the fashion industry.

It’s a tragedy when someone takes his or her own life because of ill treatment by others. But everyone who is bullied can make a choice. If only that young woman could have turned her terrible experiences around, and positively helped herself and others who face similar circumstances by standing up, standing firm, and reaching out for help.

We believe God could have helped her get through that dark moment and find her way back into the light.

          I’ve been bullied myself; I know it’s no fun.

          So what can a bullied person do?

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I will be bullied no more!

 BULLIED NO MORE

Say enough is enough by your standing; not by your retreat.

Say enough is enough through your triumphs; not by your defeat.

Say enough is enough with your faithful friends standing up for you.

Say enough is enough by telling your mom and dad and teacher, too.

Say enough is enough by being you, not by returning hate.

Say enough is enough by rising above, instead of biting their bait.

No one can make you be less than you are.  So remember when things get tough,

The ones who matter will have your back ‘cause enough is enough is enough!

© 2013 Martha Bolton

To be bullied NO MORE, and find hope when you are suffering from bullying, these articles may help:

 

Bullying Prevention Tips for Parents and Kids

Stop Bullies with Self-Confidence and God’s Help!

How to Stop Cyberbullying

Cyberbullied: Handling Mean Texts and Online Posts

 

 

Bullying Prevention Tips for Parents and Kids

By Linda Evans Shepherd:

For National Bullying Prevention Month we asked author Shannon Perry (with Master’s degree in education and counseling) some tough questions about bullying.

 

Image: David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

What do we need to teach our kids about bullying? What should a child do if they become a bully’s target or witness an act of bullying? And what do you do if you find out if it’s your child who is bullying others?

Shannon Perry offers some good bullying prevention tactics:

Linda:  Shannon, I’m glad, as you are a certified instructor in crisis counseling, that you’ve taken the time to talk with me about bullying.  Can you describe to me what the act of bullying actually is?

Shannon:  Bullying is a form of behavior used to negatively affect others where there is an “imbalance of power.” This “imbalance” may be perceived social or physical power and may be based on the grounds of race, gender, sexuality, religion or other perceived positions. Bullies like to dominate others and are very “self” focused. While some bullies believe they have the right to treat others as they choose, many bullies are simply insecure. Some bullies are victims of bullying themselves and others suffer from mental disorders and need psychiatric attention.

Linda:  As responsible adults, what can we do to help prevent bullying?

Shannon:  Teachers and parents have the responsibility to teach children how to recognize bullying and employ tactics to deal effectively with it. There are many steps that parents or educators can take as preventative measures for bullying:

  • Teach zero tolerance for any type of bullying behavior.
    • Show positive examples of acceptance of others via family time, the newspaper, magazines, tv, etc.
    • Discuss appropriate ways to handle/display anger.
    • Teach words of reconciliation and empathy such as “I’m sorry, please forgive me.”
    • Discuss movie scenes that involve bullying. As a family, discuss the appropriate behavior that should have taken place in bullying situations.

Linda:  If a child is being bullied by his peers, what steps can he take to stop the bullying?

Shannon:  Here are some practical things to do when confronted by a bully:

  • Hold your head up and look confident. Refrain from having a hurt or fearful look on your face.
  • Keep your arms to your side and stand confidently on both feet. Keep your hands out of your pockets; not folded or held up as if you want to fight.
  • Keep non-threatening eye contact with the bully.
  • Don’t run away unless you are in danger.
  • Don’t get physical with the bully or argue in return.
  • Do something that brings you confidence in your everyday life by developing a skill you are good at or taking a class.
  • Find good, true friends and share your pain with them once they can be trusted.
  • Tell trusted adults that you are being bullied. Talk to someone UNTIL YOU GET HELP! If the first adult does not take you seriously, keep going to adults until someone believes you and does something to help you.

Linda:  If a child realizes that his behavior toward others is bullying, how can they change their behavior?

Shannon:  Behavior modification starts at home with the parents. If you find out that your child is being a bully, stay calm and meet with the adults who have witnessed the behavior. Apply clear and significant consequences and require (and witness) your child to apologize to any he/she has offended. If necessary, “shadow” your child at school for a day. Go everywhere he/she goes and monitor behavior. Immediately reinforce positive behavior when your child does good and immediately seek professional help if the bullying behavior continues for an extended period of time.

Linda:  If a child’s peers are bullying a classmate, what is the best way for a student to stand up for the classmate without being bullied himself?

Shannon:  If you are a by-stander and see someone being bullied, you can also use the strategies listed above.  But, for example, if someone is being bullied about his hair, you can say something like, “I think his hair cut looks like Justin Bieber, and I wish my hair looked like his!”

Next, ask the victim to walk away with you.

Some counter-bullying tactics include getting a third party involved. For example, the victim may wish to confront the bully who has been spreading rumors about her. To do so, it would be wise to discuss this action with an adult then have others present when the interaction takes place.

 More About Shannon Perry  – Shannon is an author, recording artist, conference speaker and radio host who often tackles issues such as bullying. Her brand-new conference, “In Her Shoes,” is designed specifically for mothers and daughters, tackling issues such as bullying, self-esteem, body image, social media, dating as well as other topics affecting tween and teen girls. Shannon holds a Master’s Degree in Education and Counseling and is a Certified Instructor in Parenting Classes and Crisis Counseling. For more information visit www.ShannonPerry.com.

Stop Bullies with Self-Confidence and God’s Help!

How can having self-confidence stop bullying?

 

Nothing attracts a bully like lack-of-confidence.  In fact, showing good self-confidence is a great defense against being bullied.  But how do you get self-confidence?  Do you find it in the mirror or  in the words of your peers?

That would be nice, but that won’t always work, especially if you dislike some of your features, or if your friends (or non-friends) sometimes tease or harass you. But no worries, you can still show self-confidence to stop bullies with these 5 simple steps.

 1. Know that You are Loved

Confidence cannot be combed into place or wiped away with blemish cream.  In fact, you can be confident no matter what you look like, especially  if you know this one little secret — God loves you.  (Yes, there really is a God and he really does care about you.)  You can learn more about how to have a relationship with God at:  www.GodTest.com.  But before you  check out the ‘test’ or helps on that website, try saying the following out loud.

God loves me and if God loves me, I love me too.

Was that hard to say?  If it was, try saying it again.  Next, try writing it down on a post-it note or note card and put it where you can see it several times a day.  For the more you see it and say it, the easier it will be to believe it.  This believing will have  a big pay-off because the more you believe it, the more confidence you will have.

2. Look Confident

You can learn to project confidence even when you don’t feel confident, but it may take practice.  A recent article reported, “People are less likely to be picked on if they walk and sit with awareness, calm, respect, and confidence. Projecting a positive, assertive attitude means keeping one’s head up, back straight, walking briskly, looking around, having a peaceful face and body, and moving away from people who might cause trouble.”

This may mean you need to practice in front of a mirror so that you will learn to walk with confidence, head up, as you stride purposefully.  You may need to practice how you sit in a chair so you don’t look small or afraid, but instead look sure of yourself.  You may even need to practice how you smile and say hello to others.  Notice how others who seem confident greet others and take some pointers.  Practice speaking in a clear, calm voice when you are in private so you can do so when you are with others.

3. Learn to Walk Around a Bully as Well as His Reach

What are the best words to say to a bully who confronts you?  Imagine this; with confidence you say in reply to a snide remark, “Have a nice day,” or “See you later.” Next, calmly change seats, step out of line, or just walk away.

4. Don’t be afraid to say, “Stop, I don’t Like That.”

If someone is physically tapping, kicking, or hitting you say, “Stop. I don’t like that,” and say it loudly.  Try practicing this with your hands on your hips, with a clear firm voice.  This practice will help you be ready if you really need say it to a bully.  If that time should come and more help is needed, go get an adult.

5. Take a Stand For Yourself

Practice telling yourself the opposite of a remark meant to hurt or insult you.  I found good advice on how to do this in a great article in Kid Power which advices,  “If someone says, ‘I don’t like you,’ you can throw those words away and say, ‘I like myself.’ If someone says, ‘You are stupid’ you can throw those words away and say, ‘I’m smart.’ If someone says, ‘I don’t want to play with you’ then you can throw those words away and say, ‘I will find another friend.’”

For more help, watch what teen Macbarbie has to say about how to get self-confidence, stop bullies, and develop inner-beauty.